Magnetic particle testing (MT)

Magnetic particle testing (MT)

MPT is a fairly simple process with two variations: Wet Magnetic Particle Testing (WMPT) and Dry Magnetic Particle Testing (DMPT). In either one, the process begins by running a magnetic current through the component. Any cracks or defects in the material will interrupt the flow of current and will cause magnetism to spread out from them. This will create a “flux leakage field” at the site of the damage. The second step involves spreading metal particles over the component. If there are any flaws on or near the surface, the flux leakage field will draw the particles to the damage site. This provides a visible indication of the approximate size and shape of the flaw. There are several benefits of MPT compared to other NDE methods. It is highly portable, generally inexpensive, and does not need a stringent pre-cleaning operation. MPT is also one of the best options for detecting fine, shallow surface cracks. It is fast, easy, and will work through thin coatings. Finally, there are few limitations regarding the size/shape of test specimens. Despite its strengths, the method is not without its limits. The material must be ferromagnetic. Likewise, the orientation and strength of the magnetic field is critical. The method only detects surface and near-to-surface defects. Those further down require alternative methods. Large currents are sometimes required to perform this method, thus “burning” of test parts is sometimes possible. In addition, once MPT has been completed, the component must be demagnetized, which can sometimes be difficult.

wet magnetic particle inspection is carried out by mean of florescent magnetic particles and an UV light source, it has an advantage over a dry inspection because the equipment used in this process can quickly and easily spray a uniform layer of particles over the surface of the material or part to be inspected. The magnetic field can be produced by the use of direct current (DC) circuits or by alternating current (AC) circuits. AC circuits produce fields that are confined to the near surface of the test sample and are useful in finding surface cracks. DC circuits provide magnetic fields that penetrate a shallow distance into the test sample and are useful for also finding discontinuities below the surface.